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Hip and Thigh: Smiting Theological Philistines with a Great Slaughter. Judges 15:8

Friday, February 25, 2011

Things to Read This Weekend

I am thinking through my third installment on the subject of presuppositionalism, so in the meantime, I thought I would point out some interesting articles I have encountered over the last couple of weeks.

On the creation front,

For Valentine's Day weekend, Answers in Genesis put together a "date night" at their Creation Museum only to have it crashed by a couple of clowns posing as a gay "couple." The security were already prepared for them, because one of the agitators blogged about it extensively weeks before the "date night" event. Take a lesson here atheist trolls who want to pull some ambush stunt.

Crashing Date Night

And along the lines of biblical creationism, Terry Mortenson outlines the basics of young earth creationism,

A Summary of Young Earth Creationism

Moving to the subject of archaeology, TMS graduate, Doug Petrovich, has done an extensive study on the destruction of Hazor in Joshua 11 and how it relates to the dating of the Exodus. I may have linked this article on a previous occasion along with his other engaging work on Amenhotep II being the Exodus pharaoh. I note it again just because the Associates for Biblical Research posted it on their website,

The Dating of Hazor's Destruction in Joshua 11


Dr. Michael Vlach, who teaches at the Master's Seminary, recently started a blog. I am looking forward to how it will go for him. He already has three articles up discussing how the NT uses the OT.

Then, I came across an old article providing a bit of historical background to Reconstructionism. The author highlights all the titanic personalities and the agonizing struggle between the various factions of theonomists. It's an epic read.

An Historical Overview of Christian Reconstructionism


I also have updated my series in Genesis one with a few more messages.

The Creation Week of Genesis

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4 Comments:

Blogger thomas4881 said...

What do you think of this -

http://store.levitt.com/cgi-bin/perlshop.cgi?ACTION=enter&thispage=detail/evidence_god.html&ORDER_ID=!ORDERID!

Would you recommend Christians stay away from this ministry because of their view on creation?

10:38 PM, February 25, 2011  
Blogger Fred Butler said...

I am not familiar with the Schroeder fellow, so I can't really make a comment one way or another. His stuff looks to be basic, YEC. Unless I am missing something.

1:37 PM, February 26, 2011  
Blogger thomas4881 said...

This is what wikipedia says -

His works frequently cite Talmudic, Midrashic and medieval commentaries on Biblical creation accounts, such as commentaries written by the Jewish philosopher Nachmanides. Among other things, Schroeder attempts to reconcile a young Earth creationist Biblical view with the scientific model of a world that is billions of years old using the idea that the perceived flow of time for a given event in an expanding universe varies with the observer’s perspective of that event. He attempts to reconcile the two perspectives numerically, calculating the effect of the stretching of space-time, based on Einstein's theory of general relativity.[7]

Antony Flew, an academic philosopher who promoted atheism for most of his adult life indicated that the fine-tuned universe arguments of Gerald Schroeder convinced him to become a deist.[8][9]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_Schroeder#Religious_views

I think he's saying the earth is billions of years old in a very complex way.

11:07 PM, February 26, 2011  
Blogger Fred Butler said...

Again, I am not totally familiar with him, but if what the article says is true, his views are similar to what Russ Humphreys and others have attempted to argue with time dilation models. I am curious to the claim about how his views convinced Anthony Flew to become a deist. From what I understand about Flew, he abandoned his atheism for deism because of the influence of Gary Habermas.

5:24 PM, February 27, 2011  

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